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writing in 2018As I begin writing this morning, I have no idea as to what will appear - well, I guess that isn’t entirely true…but it would be fair to say that this is not a post that I have planned to my normal levels. A well planned blog post this morning falls secondary to just sitting and writing: for this is one of my intentions for 2018 - to get back to my blogging.

I logged on to my website a few days ago and realised it has been a full year since posting last. I knew it had been a while, but I was shocked. When I posted last January I had no idea it would be 12 months until I got around to doing it again. The cynic in me could question “what is different now”? Yet I know that blogging is important to me, to the way I work, to the way I understand my process - professionally, spiritually and personally. I don’t consider myself a creative person - blogging and my website is one way in which I CAN express myself.

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2017 goal settingWhat does 2017 have in store for you? New Year is a common time to be looking at our lives, taking stock, and considering making change. We set intentions, make resolutions and plan goals. When I get client enquries in January I notice that this is the time when people seem most resolute about what they want - a fresh year, a fresh start. Or perhaps its more true to say that people are resolute about what they don't want, and they come to therapy to explore change and what can be done.

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dont believe everything you thinkIn my last blog post, I talked about some of the theory that underpin CBT, Gestalt, and Buddhist ideas in relation to therapeutic work. As a practitioner who works mainly in relational psychotherapy (under which we would include Gestalt and Buddhist ideas), I have been intrigued by the ascendence of CBT in our national health system in the UK. I believe it wise to become familiar with a practice before making a sound judgement on its use: and indeed, this is how I feel with CBT. Whether relational psychotherapists like it or not, CBT remains the "treatment of choice", and many clients (new ones, old ones) will have dealings with it, and will form judgements on our work with them based upon those experiences. We also need to know CBT well enough to understand what makes it different to our own approach so we can then explain this to our clients*. Completing some training in CBT was therefore important to me, allowing me to use some of the ideas in my work, and to help me appreciate truly how it resonates (or not) with my own practice.

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